THE PERFECT MAN Episode 10 and 11(just as I promised) My mum shook her head as I walked in. 'Igbacha go oso, have you finished running,' she asked. I ignored her and continued walking. I was in no mood to entertain her sarcasm. I heard voices in the sitting room. The visitors were still around. I had thought Bryan's exit would hasten their departure. On the contrary, they were very relaxed. They were discussing as if nothing had happened. My dad especially. He was louder than usual, drinking palm wine with more vigor than necessary. I decided to ignore them and mourn alone. I was on my way up when my dad's voice called me back. 'So this is what you people do in America ehn? Disobey your parents,' he asked 'My brother o, this is why I insist Amaka gets married before she leaves the country,' chief Nnamdi added. 'Chief, don't mind them, they have no respect. Did you see the way he walked out of here? It was like he was in the presence of his mates,' a man I did not know spoke up. I ignored them all. Chief Nnamdi had the audacity to mention Amaka, his daughter. If only he knew half of what she did, he would not hesitate to disown her. What did they know about respect? My father had consistently disrespected Bryan, even though he did nothing to deserve it. What crime had he committed? Was being different a crime? Was he the first to marry a Nigerian igbo girl? Why were my parents so insistent on being archaic? Well I had some reflecting to do and I didn't want to waste my time standing here. 'Won't you say anything,' chief Nnamdi asked. I looked at him properly. I had never liked him as an uncle. He was very stingy and he always tried to influence my father to do his bidding when possible. 'Uncle I have nothing to say,' I replied 'Hmmm, children of nowadays. You think your father does not know what he is doing? He sent you to America to study, even against my wishes, and the thank you that he deserves is the white man you bring home. And to top it all, he blatantly disrespected your father. Instead of you to caution him, you ran after him like a love sick puppy.' He looked at my father and continued his lamentations. 'Eloka, it is you I blame after all. If you had listened to me and allowed her to school in Nigeria, this nonsense wouldn't have happened. See ehn, maka Chukwu, the day Amaka tries something like this, I will cut off both her head and her mother's head.' Tbc


'Nnamdi, forgive me. Okwa this American nonsense has ended. It won't repeat itself again. I've learnt my lesson.'

I looked at my father, his brother, then at my father again. I cleared my throat.

'Daddy.'

'Don't even daddy me. Have you not finished? Ehn kamsi, what are you still doing in America,' he asked in igbo.

I couldn't hold it in anymore. I had not yet accosted him on what he said to Bryan on their way here, and he was here insinuating I would no longer return to America.

'What is wrong with you people,' I shouted, tears pouring freely from my eyes.

'Heeeeeeyyyyy,' the unknown men screamed in unison.

I clearly ignored them.

'What did I do to deserve this? What did Bryan do to deserve this kind of treatment? He's a human being too you know?'

My mum rushed in and started dragging me away. I pulled my hand away. I had to let them know that it wasn't okay.

'Even you mum, what is really wrong with all of you?'

'Kamsi ozugo, it's ok,'

'It's not ok mum. What happened to you guys?'

'O mua ka o na akpo guys, is it me she's calling guys?' my father got up and rushed to hit me, but my mother shielded me.

I was flabbergasted. My father actually attempted to hit me at twenty four? Age was truly just a number. At that exact moment, I made up my mind to elope. I detached myself from my mother and walked upstairs. If they felt they could assault me physically and emotionally, they had another one coming. I reached my room and slumped on my bed. I brought out my phone and called Nneka. She picked immediately.

'Babe, what's up na, I hope you are better now?'

'Yea, I'm better now. But something big is up now.'

'Yaay, so which beach are we going to today,' she asked enthusiastically.

'Beach? Nneka pls focus. I'm planning to run away.'

'Run away?' Nneka went on 'ibiakwa, you have come. Which one is run away again?'

'Nneka, my father tried to hit me.'

'Ehen, and so? Kamsi is that why you want to run away, because your father tried to hit you? He didn't even hit you and you are running away. My mother gave me a knock on my head last night when I got home. Do you see me packing up and running? Kamsi what is really the problem,' she asked, concerned.

'My father is the problem. His brother is a problem. My mother too is a problem. In fact I'm fed up. How can a group of elite individuals be so stuck in the past. Am I the first person bringing home a white man,' I asked.

'Kamsi, jiri ya nwaayo, take it easy. You are not the first, neither will you be the last. But you've got to admit you sprung a surprise on them. They were expecting an igbo man and you brought Bryan. They are just lashing out. Give them time,'

'I don't have time. If I don't convince them by tonight, Bryan leaves tomorrow. And one thing I know is that I would be on that flight with him. By hook or by crook.'

'When are you supposed to leave normally,'
she asked.

'Monday.'

'Today is still Thursday, so you can work on convincing both Bryan and your parents. If that doesn't work, then you both can leave.'

That suggestion made a lot of sense. It sounded like the right thing to do. I told her I would consider that option. She continued talking.

'But babe your parents are very nice o. The day I brought home an Abia man, my father didn't speak to me for three months. So imagine if I brought home a white man.'

'So what did you do,' I asked

'Nne, what will I do na, I left the aba man na. Chai, and he was a nice man o.'

'You Nigerians are unbelievable to be very honest. So you left a perfectly good man because your father wouldn't speak to you, Nneka I'm kinda disappointed in you.'

'Onyeoma Americana. You are still a Nigerian sha. If you like, be forming 'I wanna gonna'. You know our culture and traditions. They were not established today. So don't blame anybody inugo, you hear.'

'Hmmm Nneka,' I scoffed 'some traditions are archaic and need to be abolished. Anyways, I want to come visit you. If I can work up the mood, we could go visit the mall or see a movie,' I said.

'Ehen, now you have landed, I will send Nchedo to pick you when you are ready, just flash me', she added.

As always, I automatically felt better after talking to Nneka. She raised a few good points. I needed to ask my father why he so much detested the idea of a white in-law. Other fathers, especially igbo fathers would have seen the added benefit of having Bryan in my life. I decided to ask him after the visitors had left, case point being his brother. I opened my door to peep from the rail and I caught my mother lurking by the door. What was she doing there? Perhaps she wanted to eavesdrop. Well, she was the least of my primary concern. I paid no attention to her as I looked over the rail. They were still seated, cheering as if nothing had happened. Classic igbo folks. I walked back into my room and this time my mum followed me.

'Kamsi, when I prayed to God for a child, I didn't pray for one that would kill me. Nne why do you want to bring problem between your father and I, ehn Kamsiyochukwu,' she started crying.

'Mummy pls stop crying. If anyone deserves to cry, it's me. If not that my dear ducts were exhausted, this would have been a crying competition,' I replied

'Your father and I love you so much. We have heard stories of what those white men do to black people like us. Your father is only trying to protect you.'

'Mummy, Bryan is different,' I cut in

'Nne, leave that thing. He is not different. Are you the only Nigerian girl in America? Why didn't he choose another white girl. That's how they deceive you girls over there.'

'Mummy pls beg daddy for me. I really love Bryan. And the best part is that he loves me more. Mummy that is a rare thing to have.'

'Kamsi, forget love. All my mates that married for love, none of them are still married. Even Mama Ekene that didn't let us hear word when she was about to marry is now separated with five children. But look at your father and I , almost thirty three years after and we are still solid. Do you think it's love? You will grow to love another person. Nne let this one go. What we can see sitting down, you can't see it standing. Pls don't fight your father on this one. I've said my piece,' she said, drawing her ears.

There was no point arguing with her. If for any reason, she stalled my plans. I had made up my mind. I had to elope with Bryan. I texted Nneka to tell her I was ready. This naija life was not for me. My mum left the room and I went to shower again. Damn, lagos was hot! I chose a chiffon blouse and a green bum short. I grabbed my purse from my bag and stepped out of my room. I bumped into my dad. Apparently, the visitors had left. He looked at me from head to toe.

'And where do you think you are going dressed like that,' he asked.

'I'm going to Nneka's house,' I replied.

'You think you are still in America? Jesus will bear me witness when they rape you, that I warned you,' he hissed and walked to his room.

Typical of my father. So melodramatic. I walked out of my house. I tried calling Bryan. He wasn't picking my call. What was he up to, I thought to myself. I tried once more as I got into Nchedo's car.

As soon as Nneka saw me, she whistled. Nchedo smiled too. I knew I was hot and florida girls with zero chill had taught me how to flaunt it. I decided to make the first stop at Bryan's hotel. He could follow us to the mall and cinema, at least to experience it 'Naija style'. We got to his hotel and as soon as the receptionist saw me, her face lit up. She had remembered me and this time, she offered no resistance when I took the stairs up. Bryan was happy to see me. He had been bored senseless since he left my house. I told him of our plan and he was in. I also let him in on my plan to elope. He smiled broadly. I felt it in my heart and I knew he was worth it.

We went to change some dollars into naira first and then the fun started. We went to see a movie first and seeing Nchedo jumping and clapping at the end was a great feeling. I would miss Nneka and him. I didn't have an inkling if I was ever going to come back to Nigeria so I kept hugging her any chance i had and she understood. Next, we went to the mall. Six years ago, all these weren't available. It showed the extent of development in the country. We took pictures, bought ice cream and ate pizza. It was a befitting conclusion to my stay in Nigeria.

We dropped Bryan at his hotel and went over our plan. I was to meet him by 3pm. Nchedo was to be our getaway ride. With the aid of an internet connected phone, we were able to reschedule our flight. Nneka was to stay at home to avoid any suspicion. It was a well set plan. As soon as we got to my house, Nneka shouted 'see you tomorrow' before they drove off to throw whoever was listening off6 my6 scent.

I walked into the house. It was6 strangely quiet. I called out to my mum, no response. I walked upstairs and called out again, still no response. I opened my room and walked in. Something seemed out of place. My drawers were kind of opened and my room looked like it had been searched. My hand bag was on the bed, instead of on the dresser table. I became afraid. Were we burgled? I opened the drawers and nothing seemed out of place. I checked my jewelry box and it looked untouched.for I then reached for the hand bag on the bed and scanned through the items in it. My wad of dollars was still inside, same as the engagement ring Bryan had given me. I almost released a sigh of relief when I realised that the most important item was missing: MY INTERNATIONAL PASSPORT.
Pls do like, comment and share. Tbc
THE PERFECT MAN Episode 10 and 11(just as I promised) My mum shook her head as I walked in. 'Igbacha go oso, have you finished running,' she asked. I ignored her and continued walking. I was in no mood to entertain her sarcasm. I heard voices in the sitting room. The visitors were still around. I had thought Bryan's exit would hasten their departure. On the contrary, they were very relaxed. They were discussing as if nothing had happened. My dad especially. He was louder than usual, drinking palm wine with more vigor than necessary. I decided to ignore them and mourn alone. I was on my way up when my dad's voice called me back. 'So this is what you people do in America ehn? Disobey your parents,' he asked 'My brother o, this is why I insist Amaka gets married before she leaves the country,' chief Nnamdi added. 'Chief, don't mind them, they have no respect. Did you see the way he walked out of here? It was like he was in the presence of his mates,' a man I did not know spoke up. I ignored them all. Chief Nnamdi had the audacity to mention Amaka, his daughter. If only he knew half of what she did, he would not hesitate to disown her. What did they know about respect? My father had consistently disrespected Bryan, even though he did nothing to deserve it. What crime had he committed? Was being different a crime? Was he the first to marry a Nigerian igbo girl? Why were my parents so insistent on being archaic? Well I had some reflecting to do and I didn't want to waste my time standing here. 'Won't you say anything,' chief Nnamdi asked. I looked at him properly. I had never liked him as an uncle. He was very stingy and he always tried to influence my father to do his bidding when possible. 'Uncle I have nothing to say,' I replied 'Hmmm, children of nowadays. You think your father does not know what he is doing? He sent you to America to study, even against my wishes, and the thank you that he deserves is the white man you bring home. And to top it all, he blatantly disrespected your father. Instead of you to caution him, you ran after him like a love sick puppy.' He looked at my father and continued his lamentations. 'Eloka, it is you I blame after all. If you had listened to me and allowed her to school in Nigeria, this nonsense wouldn't have happened. See ehn, maka Chukwu, the day Amaka tries something like this, I will cut off both her head and her mother's head.' Tbc THE PERFECT MAN 
Episode 10 and 11(just as I promised)

My mum shook her head as I walked in. 

'Igbacha go oso, have you finished running,' she asked.

I ignored her and continued walking. I was in no mood to entertain her sarcasm. I heard voices in the sitting room. The visitors were still around. I had thought Bryan's exit would hasten their departure. On the contrary, they were very relaxed. They were discussing as if nothing had happened. My dad especially. He was louder than usual, drinking palm wine with more vigor than necessary. I decided to ignore them and mourn alone. I was on my way up when my dad's voice called me back.

'So this is what you people do in America ehn? Disobey your parents,' he asked

'My brother o, this is why I insist Amaka gets married before she leaves the country,' chief Nnamdi added.

'Chief, don't mind them, they have no respect. Did you see the way he walked out of here? It was like he was in the presence of his mates,' a man I did not know spoke up.

I ignored them all. Chief Nnamdi had the audacity to mention Amaka, his daughter. If only he knew half of what she did, he would not hesitate to disown her. What did they know about respect? My father had consistently disrespected Bryan, even though he did nothing to deserve it. What crime had he committed? Was being different a crime? Was he the first to marry a Nigerian igbo girl? Why were my parents so insistent on being archaic? Well I had some reflecting to do and I didn't want to waste my time standing here.

'Won't you say anything,' chief Nnamdi asked.

I looked at him properly. I had never liked him as an uncle. He was very stingy and he always tried to influence my father to do his bidding when possible. 

'Uncle I have nothing to say,' I replied

'Hmmm, children of nowadays. You think your father does not know what he is doing? He sent you to America to study, even against my wishes, and the thank you that he deserves is the white man you bring home. And to top it all, he blatantly disrespected your father. Instead of you to caution him, you ran after him like a love sick puppy.'

He looked at my father and continued his lamentations.

'Eloka, it is you I blame after all. If you had listened to me and allowed her to school in Nigeria, this nonsense wouldn't have happened. See ehn, maka Chukwu, the day Amaka tries something like this, I will cut off both her head and her mother's head.'
Tbc Reviewed by De SOUL ENERGIZER on July 15, 2017 Rating: 5

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